RESEARCH

NutriGenetic Research Institute is pleased to announce that Phase IV of the “Higher Levels of Genetic Variants (SNPs) Found in those with Chronic Lyme Disease” will be presented to ILADS Annual Scientific in Boston in November 2017.

Chronic Lyme & DNA Study

Detailed below are results from the current research phases from our Chronic Lyme & DNA studies.

PHASE I – June 2016
“Higher Levels of Genetic Variants (SNPs) Found in those with Chronic Lyme Disease”
Presented by Bob Miller, CTN to the International Lyme & Associated Diseases Society (ILADS) at the 6th European Conference in Helsinki, Finland

Abstract: 192 participants, from around the world, voluntarily submitted their genome for a global contrast to data supplied by the 1000 Genome Phase 3 Project.  Participants’ genomes were evaluated through a 23andMe-supplied analysis. We examined 350 genes that are involved with mitochondrial function, methylation, neurotransmitter production, antioxidant production, and patterns that may result in excess production of oxidative stress, including superoxide, glutamate, ammonia and peroxynitrite. The data collected suggests unique genetic variations may be found in individuals with Chronic Lyme Disease. Compensating for the variants to reduce iron oxidation and improve methylation may be a helpful therapy for those with Chronic Lyme.

Read the final findings of the Chronic Lyme & DNA Study.

View the Helsinki ILADS Poster Presentation.

Watch a video that highlights the final findings of the Chronic Lyme & DNA Study.

 

PHASE II – November 2016
“Higher Levels of Genetic Variants (SNPs) Found in those with Chronic Lyme Disease – Phase II”
Presented by Bob Miller, CTN to ILADS at the 17th Annual Scientific Session in Philadelphia, PA

Abstract: To determine if those with Chronic Lyme Disease may have a unique genetic pattern that may create excess inflammation or suppress the immune system, the NutriGenetic Research Institute compared 1,298 genes of a group of 360 individuals who identified as having chronic Lyme to the data supplied by the 1000 Genome Phase 3 Project. The reference and alternate alleles for each of the SNPs (Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms) were determined using the HaploReg v4.1 database. Formulas determined the top 65 genes with more variants in those with chronic Lyme than the control group. Neurotransmitter genes represented 40 of the top 65 genes with the most variants. This analysis will focus on glutamate, dopamine and cannabinoid SNPs.

This application period for this study is now closed. Research findings will be published once the project has been completed later this fall. Thanks to everyone who participated.

• View the ILADS Philadelphia Conference Study #2 Poster Presentation

Phase III – May 2017
“Higher Levels of Genetic Variants (SNPs) Found in those with Chronic Lyme Disease – Phase III”
Presented by Bob Miller, CTN to ILADS at the 7th European Conference in Paris, France

Abstract: Genetic mutations (SNPs) can lead to increased free radicals, increased toxic substances, and reduced antioxidant protection causing difficulty detoxing and a weakened immune system that may allow Lyme to be resistant to traditional treatment. To evaluate this hypothesis, 391 participants reporting chronic Lyme disease from around the world voluntarily submitted their 23andMe supplied analysis genome for a global contrast to data supplied by the 1000 Genome Project. We evaluated genes that when variated would increase iron levels, and decrease the antioxidant capacity of the body. The reference and alternate alleles for each of the SNPs were determined using the HaploReg v4.1 database. This data was then compared to data supplied by the 1000 Genome Phase 3 Project. The ratio of SNPs between the Chronic Lyme Group and the Genome Project study was then calculated.

View the Paris ILADS Poster Presentation.

 

Phase IV – Coming November 2017
“Higher Levels of Genetic Variants (SNPs) Found in those with Chronic Lyme Disease – Phase IV”
To be presented to ILADS at the 18th Annual Scientific Session in Boston, MA

 

If you are interested in learning more about your own unique DNA and participating in future NutriGenetic Research Institute studies, we utilize data from the 23andMe® DNA test (www.23andMe.com).

23andMe® is the registered trademark of 23andMe®, Inc.
NutriGenetic Research Institute is not affiliated with 23andMe®.